When Should I Seek a Protective Order?

Written on February 16, 2021

In any family law situation, whether it’s a divorce, child custody, or support case, emotions can run high and can even turn violent. Family violence has a broad definition and can include physical violence, emotional abuse, threats, threatening behavior, or harassment. If you find yourself on the receiving end of these acts; there are several things that you should do right away; you can call the police and/or seek a protective order.

First, you should try to document the situation. It may not be possible to actually record the situation but once you feel safe you can memorialize what happened through writing it down or texting friends or family. You should also decide if police intervention is necessary. If you are in fear for your safety, your first call should always be to the police.

Calling the police can be an extreme step in these types of matters as it may end up with one party being arrested and criminally charged.

If the police believe that the incident warrants further intervention, they will usually remove one party from the home and give the victim advice about seeking a protective order, and some will go so far as helping the victim get an emergency protective order. Either way, the police will make an incident report with the date, time, location, and responding officers to the scene. This will create a record that can be used later in your case, if necessary.

If you do not call the police at the time of the incident, and you have a continuing fear of the other party, you can still seek a protective order on your own. You will have to go to your local magistrate and swear to the facts of the situation that lead you to seek the protective order. You must show there is a credible fear and a continuing fear of other party. If you have children, you may want to add your child to your request for a protective order. If the magistrate believes that a credible threat exists, you will be awarded a preliminary protective order which will last until the court is able to have hearing, usually two weeks.

If you are afraid of your spouse, it is best to not wait to seek a protective order. The more time that you let lapse between the incident and seeking the protective order, the less likely it is that you will get the relief that you are seeking.

Frequently, we receive phone calls from people who will discuss what their significant other did a few months ago, or even years ago, and then want to know about seeking a protective order. If you have waited a significant amount of time and have continued living together, the court will not grant your request for a protective order. If there has been a recent incident, you may want to bring up prior incidents in the hearing to show the court the pattern of behavior and risk to your safety. If you move out as a result of a violent incident, you should remain out of the home until your protective order case can be heard. With all protective orders, you can request the court dismiss it in the future if necessary, but it’s hard to get it back once it’s gone.

Family violence is very serious and if you have been a victim or have been accused of family violence it is very important to contact one of our experienced attorneys at Melone Hatley to help you through this process. Contact us for a phone consultation today.

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